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Tagged Posts - A-Ha Official Site
November 25th2014
User Icon - A-Ha Official SitePosted By: Catherine

‘Apparatjik World’ Book

apparatjik world – coming to a world near you.

this book is totally awesome and shows the width and girth…eh scope of apparatjik’s amazingly varied and unique production over the years since the start in 2007…8? the many and varied apparatjik projects have resisted definition and classification in the media since day one, and this book sums up the impressive apparatjik oevre: surreal, chaotic, anarchic and playful by nature, yet undertaken with great sincerity and serious optimism, often involving a great number of supporters in the creative processes. apparatjik is quite simply the brainchild of 4 people who are determined to do things the difficult way, avoiding all aspects of the system available to them, and insisting on the freedom to raise the child in an atmosphere free of conformity and health & safety regulations.

the book is beautifully produced, both conceptually and technically, and apart from giving a rare insight into a cluster of creative minds refusing to play the cards they have been dealt themselves, it is highly entertaining and a must for anyone who is interested in the weirder intersections between popular-music and art.

more info to come.

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November 17th2014
User Icon - A-Ha Official SitePosted By: Catherine

Terry Slater Fan Convention Q&A

Thanks to the efforts of convention guest Chris Fournier, we have a lot of videos to share from the a-ha fan convention. Below is a playlist including 11 short clips from Terry Slater’s Q&A on October 25, as well as a transcript. More material from the convention will follow!

Nicola: My question goes back to the early days. Given your tremendous experience in the music business and the number of acts you have worked with, you must have had loads of up and coming bands approaching you wanting you to help them.

So I am interested to know, what was it about a-ha that struck a chord with you that made you really want to work with them, what was the special thing? And what are your memories about that time with a-ha?

Terry: When one is in the music business, the most important thing is the music. When I first met Mags and Morten and Paul, they had some demos and they showed real promise. I was really excited and I thought that eventually they would write hit songs. When I met them, the songs were so-so [laughs], but they had promise. So that was very exciting for me. And I actually only met them just once and I said ‘Go away and write some more songs,’ which they did. I was doing some work in America at the time, going from England to America. I came back and they had some extra songs which they brought to me and immediately I just knew they were going to be successful. So what attracted me to a-ha was their songs, they were exceptionally good writers for such a young age. And that is the answer why I was attracted to them.

Thomas: I’ve heard, I don’t know if it is true, but I heard that the video for ‘Take On Me’ – that you gave your own money to produce it, because you believed that this would become a hit. Is this true?

Terry: That’s not true at all. The record company paid for the video, as they normally would. We happened to be extremely lucky to be working with the exceptional director Steve Barron, and other people. And the video turned out to be iconic, that happened and we were blessed with that. But no, it was just the normal amount of money that was spent.

Paula: I’m going back to the early days, and thinking about the image of a-ha at the time. They maybe had some difficulty shrugging off that dreaded ‘boy band’ tag that seemed to be attached to them. Did you feel that there was any other way you could have presented a-ha to the market, or was the music industry at the time really pushing for this poster boy image for a-ha?

Terry: I don’t like that term ‘boy band’ or whatever. They were just really cool guys with great music. Maybe you see it differently, that they pushed the boy band image, I never saw it like that. I just saw them as serious musicians, they happened to be nice looking guys, but then most pop groups or bands of that era – usually the guys were nice looking anyway. I don’t think they were promoted as a boy band, no.

Christina: Why did a-ha decide to split up after 1994, could you give us any information about why this break up happened?

Terry: It is interesting, given the history of rock and roll. In a way is what I term ‘a natural evolution’. Because it’s like a marriage. Some people are married for one year, two years, five years, and some for life. But usually in the music business, I mean you tell me, how many bands ever stay together without some break, at some time [...] There’s nothing wrong in that, it is a natural evolution.

The most important thing to me is that it is really nice that even when groups break up for a while and do solo projects, they may remain friends, and it is a natural evolution.

It’s important that you know this, for every group, for every artist, that when their career starts, there are enormous demands put on the artist. We see them on TV and hear the records and think ‘That’s it.’ But the life of an artist or a musical group is extremely difficult and very demanding. On the first point, they are human beings, they have families, they’re married, they have children, whatever. But when you sign with a record company, the record company makes enormous demands on you.

With a-ha, when their first record happened, it happened in 30-40 countries. So you have got to imagine that you’ve got 30-40 record companies – it’s the same record company but their offices are in these 40-50 countries – and they all want a-ha tomorrow morning at 9:00. It’s crazy. There is all this planning, where the boys have to be flown around the world. They get off the plane and there isn’t any just sitting around, when they arrive there are record company people there, and they grab you and pull you here and there. You have to go do interviews on the radio and television shows, and you do interviews, interviews, interviews. And this is before you start touring, this is called promotion – that can be just one morning, and then at 2:00 in the afternoon you’re on a plane to another city or another country, and you do the same thing again. And this builds up enormous tension.

At first there is a lot of adrenaline, because everybody is excited. But after a while it really drags you down. It’s really important to keep healthy and to be focused, and you need a lot of luck. It’s not an easy business, it’s very, very difficult.

With a-ha I think they did remarkably well, to have stayed together for so long.

Dave: I don’t know what a manager does for a band, so could you describe or be more specific about your job duties were with a-ha?

Terry: The role of the manager is quite important. The manager’s job is to have a vision for where this group is going to go. In this case, I was lucky to be working with some major bands, and I knew what to do.

The objective for a manager is to keep the group together as best as possible in terms of friendship, to hopefully make the right decisions for them in terms of: should they tour now or tour later. The manager would, with the record company and with the artist – you’ve gotta pick the right producers for the record you’re going to make, pick the right directors who are making your videos. And when it comes time to tour, it’s the manager’s job to get the most proficient promoter so everything goes safely and smoothly. And then when you are going to these 30-40 countries, you need – in my case I had done it before, so it was easier – but you have to make sure the group stays healthy, stays focused. The manager has to keep constant contact with the record companies because they are making enormous demands on us all the time. Sometimes you have to offend them and say no to certain requests, other times it’s ok.

It’s not easy being a manager. There is an old saying in the music business. When everything goes well, people say ‘Why do you need a manager?’ and when everything goes wrong, it’s the manager’s fault. It’s hard to win.

Helen: I’ve noticed that the band has dedicated two songs to you. Morten dedicated a song to you last night, and the band dedicated a song to you on the final tour. They see you as very much a part of the band, and they have a very special relationship with you. Could you talk a little bit about your special relationship with the band, and Morten in particular?

Terry: The relationship is born and grows along the lines of history we have been discussing. Now I have been with the boys for 30 years, that’s a long time. And you grow as a family. And you get to know each other, and you love each other – which we all do – we argue – which we all do. And you embrace the good times, which we all had. It’s a special relationship. I feel very privileged that after 30 years firstly that I am still alive [laughs]. But it is nice to know that with Magne and Paul and Morten, that they are there as people I love. I have a lot to thank them for.

You have to realize that for me that’s a big chunk of my life that I’ve been with a-ha. It wasn’t just being a manager. I have spent most of my adult life working with a-ha. We’ve grown up as a family. I know they love me as much as I love them, and that’s about it. There is no favoritism, there is nothing else, just four people that were brought together by various circumstances and we’ve enjoyed good health and success for the last 30 years.

Nicola: As you were saying, you have a very long relationship with a-ha. You must have some fantastic stories. I am just wondering if there is a particular standout moment that you could share with us?

Terry: To be honest, there are so many funny stories. When we all first started on the road together, just crazy things would happen. We’d miss flights, Paul would lose his passport, Magne would lose his wallet, Morten would arrive in the wrong country. Just crazy things. Many times I would sit at home with a glass of wine and think back on a lot of really funny things. I mean we have lost Morten for months sometimes. Mind you, he’s lost most of the time [laughs].

The great thing about a-ha is we are all individuals. Paul has his thinking and way of life and attitude, Magne has his thoughts and way of life, and Morten has his. We try to put all those differences aside when we are a group. When we are a-ha and Terry Slater, and we do things. But apart from that, yeah everybody’s got their own thing. They really are funny guys.

[…]

Terry: What makes a-ha special, what makes any group special, is their material. It’s their music. Because people listen to the radio, they buy records. The basic fact of the industry is it’s about music, songs, not how somebody looks. How long can that last, 3 minutes? It’s crazy. If you take a-ha, they had an enormous amount of hits. I don’t need to tell you that, that’s why you’re here today, because of your love and respect for the band and all the material they’ve written. Their songs are really, really brilliant. And I don’t need to say that because we wouldn’t be here today, they wouldn’t have had this 30 year career if they hadn’t written good songs.

Would you go see a band that wrote rubbish songs? You wouldn’t even know about them, and you certainly wouldn’t go and see them. But at least when you go to see a-ha, and you’re waiting for those records to come out, they are all great songs. People always say bands fade and break up sometimes. People ask me why. I say well a lot of the time it’s when you stop writing hits. If you stop writing hits, it ain’t gonna happen for a while. With a-ha they had hit after hit after hit. They were writing wonderful material, that was directed at their public, who had grown up with them, like yourselves. And now it’s academic because their music is all around the world, everybody knows it. I am personally very proud of the songs they have written.

Ildiko: My question to you would be related to the music. You have been so long together with a-ha and you know their style. I would like to ask you, what do you think about their individual music projects?

Terry: To be honest, I respect that they have done their own individual projects, but it’s not something I really get into all the time. I know what Magne is doing, I understand what he is doing and I respect it. I understand what Paul is doing, the same. And I understand what Morten is doing. But I can’t say any more than that. Because I have no larger opinion than you would have. I support them as human beings, if they are doing something that’s really productive and giving them happiness and hopefully giving happiness to other people.

I just respect them for carrying on, they didn’t just play for a while and fall asleep. They are very, very active. And that means that they are also very, very clever and very productive, very active. They are unique and special like that, they are moving forward all the time. That was the secret of their success with a-ha. They were always going forward, always climbing the tree. So then they have a little break and they are doing their own thing. Fantastic.

Heather: I grew up raised on the Everly Brothers, all these great acts, and my first rock concert ever when I was 11 years old was a-ha. I see these changes throughout the music industry over the years, and to me I see a decline in talent. And as other people are saying, there is nothing like a-ha, nothing like the Everly Brothers. What is your professional opinion on the state of the music industry, on whether you think the talent is maybe declining.

Terry: Very good comment, very good question. In the younger days, there was more space for people to be creative, for song writers to write and to experiment. Also, in the 50s, 60s and 70s, the record companies – when they signed an act that they believed in, they were quite happy – like take Prince, Prince made 5 or 6 albums before it happened. So the record companies would be supportive of developing the talent that they had bought.

Now the problem we have today in my opinion is it’s too fast. A group is signed to a record company, they don’t even get a chance to make an album on the whole. If the first single doesn’t make it, they’re gone. Next please, next please. I don’t like the way the business is today necessarily, because great talent is lost because they’re not given the opportunity to develop and grow. Record companies won’t give the time or the money.

What I will say, the tragedy that is really happening is because the way the world is today, the music business, the speed that things operate, there is fantastic talent out there that will never make it. And that breaks my heart. I travel the world quite a bit even today, I go to different countries during the year, and I see the most wonderful talent and I know it will never ever make it, they will never get into a record company and if they did, they wouldn’t understand. It’s very sad, but that is the world that we live in. But that is obvious to everybody here. It’s a shame. We must develop talent, if we don’t develop talent, it’s never gonna happen.

Ari: The last thing you said is like an introduction to my question. I am working as a musician, as a vocalist, and I have a-ha as one of my inspirations. I was wondering if you have any specific advice as a manager, is there anything that you can see in a specific artist that shows this person is going to make it?

Terry: For me, that is a very easy question. And I have a very simple answer. We have an expression in the business, it’s called ‘ears’. Have you got good ears? I was born with good ears. When I was a kid I would sit by the radio and listen to the songs and the structure, and it’s just a God given gift. I can usually and honestly say that I know when I hear a hit.

When I signed Queen to EMI, nobody liked them. They wore painted finger nails and makeup and whatever. Everybody thought they were rubbish, but I looked through that, I listened to the songs. Listened to Freddie Mercury when he was writing ‘Killer Queen’. I always knew, I always believed. When I first met Kate Bush who was 14 years old and she gave me a song called ‘A man with a child in his eyes,’ I was like ‘Wow!’ and I instinctively knew. And I gave her like 500 pounds, well she was 14 so I gave it to her father. And she became Kate Bush. For me, I don’t have a problem with it, it’s always easy for me. I make mistakes like everybody else, but I wouldn’t be sitting here today if I wasn’t right most of the time.

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November 13th2014
User Icon - A-Ha Official SitePosted By: Catherine

Paola Iezzi covers ‘The Sun Always Shines On TV’

On November 6, Paola Iezzi released the EP ‘I.Love’, which includes a cover of ‘The Sun Always Shines on TV’. The song debuted at #1 in Italy, Spain and Argentina.

Paola Iezzi - I.Love

More from the press release:

“Produced and arranged by Cristiano Norbedo and Andrea Rigonat (who in Italy also collaborate with some of the most prestigious pop artists on the Italian scene), under the artistic direction of Paola, the song gets stripped of its ‘80s feel and is given a new appeal. The arrangement has an almost Western feel to it. The rhythm portrays a ride in the West and the guitar has more of a Western surf feel, transporting the listener into a desert-like ambiance, hypnotic and hot, which brings attention to the great melody of this wonderful song. The vocal interpretation, however, maintains very similar to that of the band’s lead singer Morten Harket. It is truly a fantastic homage to the song and to the band, one on the best pop bands of the ‘80s.”

Watch a teaser of the track here:

Download: iTunes Italy || Google Play

Paola Iezzi is an Italian artist, singer, producer and DJ who was part of the pop duo “Paola e Chiara” which released the massive hit “Vamos a bailar” in April 2000 achieving success all over Europe, Japan and Latin America. Paola has been a big fan of a-ha, and has followed them since the early days and ‘Hunting High and Low’.

Follow Paola Iezzi:

Official Site || Facebook || YouTube || Google+

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2014 a-ha Fan Weekend – The Convention

The 2014 Fan Convention in Oslo was a very special event, bringing together a panel of six guest speakers from among a-ha’s business and industry connections, as well as one of the band members. The speakers included a-ha’s first manager, Terry Slater; their current manager, Harald Wiik; their official photographer Stian Andersen and his colleague Erik Treimann, who together directed, filmed and edited Morten Harket’s latest music video; Norwegian singer Tini, who is Magne’s protégé from The Voice; and Magne himself.

We wish to extend our sincerest gratitude to all of the guest speakers who joined us and shared their experiences with the participants at the convention.

Instead of telling the story of the convention from our perspective, we are pleased to share with you reports written by Nicola Hunt and Meri Brady, two of the fan volunteers who helped organize the weekend’s events.

 


 

by Nicola Hunt

In the run up to the 2014 a-ha fan convention and party, the team of volunteers was busy coordinating plans and making arrangements. The excitement was building in the team as the activities were confirmed: Stella would once again be offering her a-ha themed nails and temporary tattoos, we agreed to hold a charity raffle to raise funds for the Norwegian Red Cross, we discussed ideas for the fan action at Morten’s concert, and Gemma confirmed that she would be baking a-ha-themed cookies. The plans quickly took shape, as a trivia quiz was added and we received the good news that David would once again join the team as DJ at the party. I was particularly excited as the speakers for the fan convention were confirmed, as I had always wanted the opportunity to hear from a-ha’s first manager, Terry Slater, about his experiences in the early years with a-ha. What a great chance to hear some interesting stories and even some new tidbits of information.

I volunteered to help the team at the fan convention. I imagined that this would involve helping with the set up, handing round the microphone and generally running around helping where I could. I was therefore honored and touched to be asked by Catherine to introduce Terry Slater! I’m not a confident public speaker, and in my working life I do everything I can to avoid having to give presentations in front of an audience, but this was an opportunity that I had to seize with both hands. Terry Slater is one of the a-ha heroes in my eyes: I had to do this!

As the date of the convention got closer, I spent some time researching Terry’s career. The story of the beginning of a-ha is well known, and I was also aware of his links with the Everly Brothers. I hadn’t realized that he had actually worked with the Everlys for over 11 years, playing bass for them and songwriting (including the song ‘Bowling Green’, which a-ha sang as a tribute to Terry at the final a-ha concert in Oslo on 4th December 2010). Prior to this, he had worked as a backing musician for many great American artists, such as Chuck Berry, Fats Domino and Little Richard. He also had a wealth of experience in the business side of the music industry, both in publishing and A&R with EMI, where he had signed huge acts such as Duran Duran, David Bowie, Queen and Kate Bush. The more I learned about Terry’s career, the more excited I became about the convention and the opportunity to introduce Terry, a true legend of the music business.

On the day itself, I arrived at the convention venue at 2.30pm to help with the event set up. Already there were fans waiting around outside, even though the event wasn’t due to start until later in the afternoon. The venue was a hive of activity, as the team began arranging things for the convention. Tables were positioned in the entrance hallway where the fans would later be able to exchange their tickets for special green wristbands. The wristbands had been printed in big sheets which needed to be separated to reveal the individual bands. A small group of us began separating the bands so that we would be ready to hand the bands out as quickly as possible to the waiting fans. Meanwhile, Stella and Jorg were preparing the equipment for the nail art and temporary tattoos, Yvonne was putting out the signage, the Red Cross collection tin was secured and Gemma’s cookies were laid out for sale. Stian Andersen was setting out a display of his a-ha prints and book that would be available to purchase, and Meri was preparing the area where Tini’s picture discs and CDs would be sold and signed by Magne and Tini. We were nearly ready!

At around 2.50pm imagine the surprise in the team when Magne arrived! Catherine introduced him to us, and explained that some members of the team had volunteered at 4 or 5 parties. We all had the chance to chat with him and there were a lot of smiles and laughs as team member Mags gave a-ha Mags her name badge to wear.

Mags and Mags

Gemma also presented Magne with a bag of her a-ha cookies. The atmosphere was very light hearted and fun, and Magne was patient and generous with his time with us. I was so pleased to be able to have my photograph taken with him once more. Suddenly we realized that it was nearly 3.30pm and that soon the fans would be arriving to collect their wristbands. The team jumped into action and soon wristbands were being distributed and fans were taking their seats in the venue. I had placed name tags on the chairs on the stage so that the speakers would know where to sit. It felt strange to think that I would indirectly be telling Magne where he should sit down!

I reserved seats for myself and Anne-Marie (who would be introducing Stian Andersen, and photographing the event) on the front row, so that we would have easy access to the stage to give our introductions. The room was filling up with fans, and soon it was time for the event to begin. Because of the excitement of meeting Magne, and being occupied with helping with the event preparations, I hadn’t begun to get nervous about getting up on the stage in front of so many people. Until now. Before I knew it, Catherine was on the stage, welcoming the guests and explaining the schedule for the event, and Terry Slater then joined her on the stage.

Introducing Terry Slater

I took the microphone and went onto the stage, and was very amused to hear some loud shouts of encouragement from my friends in the audience. I was also hoping that no one could see how much my knees were shaking with nerves! I gave my introduction which got smiles of encouragement from Terry, and after asking the first question, took my seat in the audience. Many of the fans in the audience had some really interesting questions for Terry, and I was lucky enough to be able to ask him a few more questions as the event progressed. It was so fascinating to hear the recollections of the man who had been instrumental in launching a-ha to the world, and I felt quite moved by his obvious continued love for the band. As the questions for Terry drew to a close, I realized my one regret: I should have taken the opportunity to shake Terry’s hand and thank him whilst I was up on the stage. Too late!

The rest of the convention seemed to fly by, and I was completely absorbed in the interesting observations from the panel of Terry, Stian, Erik, Harald, Tini and Magne. I know many fans were excited to hear from Magne (as I was too), but in many ways I was more moved by the answers from Terry and Harald, both of whom are clearly huge fans of a-ha. I felt shivers down my spine when Harald said that he remembers where he was when he found out that a-ha had gone to #1 in the USA with Take On Me, and that Terry Slater was his hero too. I felt so lucky to be in the room to hear these insights.

The convention panel

The audience

At 6:00 the Q&A was over. I could have listened to the speakers for hours, and still had plenty of questions for Terry! But there was plenty more activity to come. Magne and Tini were due to sign copies of Tini’s picture disc, and already a huge queue was forming for this. A group of fans stayed by the stage to record a video for the a-ha Facebook page, and once this was over I went to help Stian Andersen, who was selling photographic prints and copies of his a-ha photo book. There was plenty of interest in the prints and Stian took time to sign prints, pose for photos and talk to the fans. Meanwhile, at the next table Magne and Tini were inundated with fans having picture discs signed and photos taken.

All too soon, the convention was over, and it was time to prepare the room for the party later that evening, and dash to Morten’s concert.

I was buzzing from the convention and when it was over, I couldn’t help but to reflect on my life as an a-ha fan. When ‘Take on Me’ was a hit in 1985, all I ever wanted was to see a-ha in concert, just once. At the time, that seemed like an impossible dream. I had read about Terry Slater, and I knew the story of a-ha’s attempts to make it big off by heart. Fast forward 29 years and I have traveled the world to see a-ha perform and become part of a wonderful network of international fans who have become lifelong friends. I never imagined that one day I would be standing in a room full of a-ha fans introducing and welcoming Terry Slater, who doesn’t know it, but was instrumental in giving me those opportunities. Thank you a-ha.com, and Terry, from the bottom of my little black heart.

Fan convention

 


 

by Meri Brady

The last hour of the Fan Convention was dedicated to a record and CD signing by Magne Furuholmen and Tini Flaat. The two were stationed side by side at the back of the room, adjacent to a long table where Stian Andersen’s books and photographic prints were being sold, along with Tini’s debut album, ‘Undo My Heart’, and a limited edition vinyl collector’s edition of the album that bore artwork by Magne Furuholmen.

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Some fans had purchased the CDs or collector’s edition vinyl during Morten’s concert at Sentrum Scene the previous evening, where Tini was the opening act. Others formed a queue immediately following the panel discussions on stage, anxious to purchase the CD, the vinyl, or both. Event volunteers assisted in making sure the process went smoothly, but despite the fans’ excitement to have a moment with Tini and Magne, everyone was respectful and polite. Tini and Magne interacted with the hundreds of attendees, allowing pictures, smiling, and providing a memorable experience for those who had come to Oslo from all over the world.

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I was able to watch the interaction from the perspective of a volunteer, standing next to Tini and Magne’s table, handling the record and CD sales. For the first few moments of the hour, my hands shook, and I could barely look over at the two of them: I was so awed to be in their presence. Despite my shaking hands, I managed to learn a quick lesson in the use of credit cards with chips and electronic device (thanks, Tor), and soon we were processing sale after sale, barely pausing. Magne smiled and joked and allowed his picture to be taken with fan after fan, while Tini greeted the attendees warmly. The hour flew by, the vinyl collector’s edition pile was empty and less than half of the CDs remained. When I looked up again, the event was over and people were subsiding with a sigh, like a great wave moving away from the shore. I was grateful for my place in the world at that moment.

 


 

We will have more content from the convention very soon! Much of the Q&As were recorded, and the video/audio is being edited now.

Thank you to Anne-Marie Forker, Meri Brady and Lena Kolena for the photos in this article. More photos can be found here.

A huge thank you to the fan volunteers who helped to organize the 2014 Fan Weekend: Nicola Hunt, Anne-Marie Forker, Yvonne Hendrich, Mags Foremka, David Sowter, Meri Brady, Stephanie Mehrwald, Edith Mehrwald, Stella and Jorg Danker, Gemma Mañosa, Gina van Haperen-Tijnagel and Eve Desianto. Your hard work and creative ideas were invaluable!

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November 9th2014
User Icon - A-Ha Official SitePosted By: Catherine

‘You’re welcome in my town’

These lyrics from Morten’s hit song ‘Brother’ became a common theme among the thousands of fans who gathered in Oslo two weeks ago for Morten’s final two concerts on the tour. It is always a special experience to see any of the guys perform in their home town, and fans traveled from around the globe to see Morten in Oslo on October 24 and 25.

On October 24, Morten was interviewed by TV2, and NRK set up a meet & greet for a group of nine fans whose story was shared in the Fan Corner in September; read the story of their meeting with Morten here.

Queues for Morten Harket concerts in Oslo are almost legendary. Fans were in line from around 6:00am on October 24, and by the time the doors opened, excitement was at a fever pitch. Here is the outside of Sentrum Scene just as the doors opened:

 

To ensure that the fans visiting from outside Norway felt welcome and included, Morten spoke mostly in English between songs. He was very relaxed and he responded to some of the comments and questions shouted from the audience.

During the encore, as a surprise for Morten, many fans raised flags from their native countries as part of a fan action arranged in advance.

On both nights, Morten ended his set with a cover of the Everly Brothers song, ‘Let It Be Me’.

Setlist

Do You Remember Me?
Oh What A Night
Spanish Steps
End Of The Line
Darkspace
Did I Leave You Behind?
Send Me An Angel
Movies
Lay Me Down Tonight
Shooting Star
Safe With Me
There Is A Place
Wild Seed
Los Angeles
Whispering Heart

Brother
A Kind Of Christmas Card
Let It Be Me (Everly Brothers cover)

Here is a playlist of a selection of live clips from fans on YouTube:

Photos from the concerts are over on Facebook:

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POSTS TAGGED WITH: Norwegen

November 25th2014

‘Apparatjik World’ Book

apparatjik world – coming to a world near you.

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November 17th2014

Terry Slater Fan Convention Q&A

A playlist including 11 short clips from Terry Slater’s Q&A on October 25.

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November 13th2014

Paola Iezzi covers ‘The Sun Always Shines On TV’

Italian singer Paola Iezzi has released the EP ‘I.Love’, which includes a cover of ‘The Sun Always Shines on TV’

READ MORE

2014 a-ha Fan Weekend – The Convention

The 2014 Fan Convention in Oslo was a very special event, bringing together a panel of six guest speakers from among a-ha’s business and industry connections, as well as one of the band members.

READ MORE
November 9th2014

‘You’re welcome in my town’

Fans traveled from around the globe to see Morten in Oslo on October 24 and 25.

READ MORE
October 30th2014

‘Just keep guessing’

Be sure to keep an eye on a-ha’s Facebook page, where there are some numerical clues being posted lately. As […]

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October 30th2014

New video greetings from Morten

Morten performed two concerts in Russia earlier this month, in St. Petersburg and Moscow. He received a very warm welcome […]

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Apparatjik perform at opening concert in Fosnavåg

It was a memorable opening concert in Fosnavåg last Thursday night, when Apparatjik joined a mix of world-famous artists and […]

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Q&A with Magne and Tini at the Oslo Fan Convention

We are so excited to share the news that Magne and Tini will participate in the Fan Convention in Oslo […]

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a-ha Fan Weekend 2014 Agenda

Here is a list of all activities confirmed so far for the a-ha fan weekend!

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